How to Be Lucky When Gambling in a Casino, Poker Game, Lottery Or Horse Racing Using Proven Methods

Luck is the most important part of gambling, as anyone who has spent any time in a casino, at the race track betting on horse racing, playing the lottery, poker, blackjack or any game of chance can tell you. Some people seem to be luckier than others and demonstrate the truth behind the old saying, “I’d rather be lucky than good.” How true that is. Good luck will get you through almost anything and no matter how deep you may appear to be in the soup, you may come out smelling like a rose if you have good fortune.

Of course, most people believe that it is impossible to change destiny or fortune so it is impossible to control your luck, but that may not actually be the case. Science has demonstrated that there are times when people win more and lose less. In his book, “The Conscious Universe,” Professor Dean Radin analyzed the results of four years of data from casinos. He was looking for a correlation between the phases of the moon, strength of the Earth’s geomagnetic fields, and casino payout percentages. During the full moon the Earth’s geomagnetic field is usually at its weakest. Professor Radin believes there may be some connection between the Earth’s magnetic fields, the moon, human psychic ability, and gambling.

One scientific study that Prof. Radin mentions in his book did demonstrate that people seem to be more psychic during the full moon, then their abilities seem to wane during the quarter moons and increase again during the new moon. This fluctuation in psychic ability seems to also follow luck because four years of casino data showed that payouts increased at the time of the full moon and decreased at other times for most casino games studied. Perhaps our intuition or psychic ability really does help us to win, whether it is picking the slot machine that is about to pay out, or knowing whether to hit a 13 at the blackjack table, or which horse will win the race. Poker players can certainly use intuition to their benefit.

The conclusion he reached was that if gamblers avoided the casinos during the quarter moons and gambled around the time of the full moon, they would decrease their losses or even win a profit. Of course, these are just generalizations and should not be considered an inducement to gamble, but they show promise for really understanding how to be lucky.

Lotteries showed a different trend. It appears that Pick 3 style lotteries pay out more during the times of the quarter moons and lower payouts during the full moon. Fluctuations in the magnetic fields of the earth, once again, seemed to have an effect. While the phase of the moon or strength of the earth’s fields will not guarantee you a winner, it may be a good idea to start making your winning and losing days on a calendar and watch where they fall according to the moon’s phases.

Other studies have shown that when people have a positive attitude and expect to win, they actually do win more often. That makes sense, doesn’t it? If you expect to win you may make choices that will have a positive effect. For instance, if you are in a casino and looking for a blackjack table and expect to lose, you won’t be too fussy about which table you sit at. But if you expect to win you may take more time selecting the table and finding one where the gamblers seem to be happier and smiling, meaning they are winning and the table is paying out better. You may not do it consciously, but you could do this and other things subconsciously just because you have a winning attitude and expect to win. We make a lot of choices when gambling whether we are at the race track betting on horse racing or choosing a place or game in a casino or even selecting lottery numbers.

So my advice to you is that you keep track of your winning and losing days and the phases of the moon. Also, keep a positive attitude. If you expect to win, perhaps it is a good day to take a chance, but if you expect to lose or just don’t feel lucky, maybe it would be better to save your money until you feel the earth’s fields, moon, or just plain old luck are working for you.

Poker Book Report Wars: Arnold Snyder Challenges David Sklansky

Arnold Snyder is not new to gambling, but he is a new writing force in the world of poker. Having recently written a ground breaking tournament poker manual, he has ignited a debate of old school verses new school, aggression versus conceding, and blunt force betting verses the fear of losing. With the publication of The Poker Tournament Formula, Snyder has captured a loyal and expanding audience of strategy-hungry tournament players that contribute to Snyder’s online forum like packs of wolves, frequently taking frisky bites at the old school tournament thinkers.

Collectively, those thinkers are represented (at least ideologically) by David Sklansky the resident professor and writer of Tournament Poker for Advanced Players. This book, now several years since its first publication, and before the boom, put into motion the tight-early and tight-aggressive strategy that simply made common sense of hold’em tournaments. This strategy is guided in nature by the Gap Concept described in Sklansky’s book as “you need a better hand to play against someone who has already opened the betting, than you would need to open yourself”. Even modern superstar writers like Dan Harrington and Phil Gordon use this in their strategies as well, so you know it has to have some merit. As such, it is not unusual to find that squeaky, tight-aggressive player at numerous final tables that has got enough playable cards during the tournament to have survived to the final table.

Survived is the key word here, as he (insert any Sklansky drone) is rarely among the chip leaders. Further, rarely does the player return to a final table, because the basic tight strategy of relying on enough quality hands also has to be fused with having them actually win pots, and hold up throughout the tournament. As Snyder points out with much experience, it is those “quality” hands he gets kicked out of tournaments playing, as opposed to position plays with weak holdings.

Where Snyder feels The Gap is a completely misguided concept is in the smaller buy-in tournaments that many players participate daily, in local casinos, regional events and online poker sites. Snyder feels that this is a lucrative segment, as many players may never have a bankroll big enough for $10,000 and $15,000 entry fees for the WPT and WSOP. However, if you play these smaller tourneys the way Snyder plays them, you will soon enough be able to pay for a $10,000 entry fee!

Snyder breaks these smaller tournaments down, and categorizes them into a skill level based on the chip and blind structure combined with the amount of entries. Depending on the skill level and patience factor of the tournament, your strategy is going to be radically different than anything Sklansky would recommend. The underlining of that strategy is based largely on position play, and pressuring your opponents, who have likely missed the flop as much as you have. This is executed in spite of your hole cards, not because of them. Snyder’s wolves say this strategy works it sheer numbers in large part because of the Sklansky type tournament opponents who know nothing more than to fold out of position or out of flop weakness.

Both writers have forums and both have supporters, and it is interesting to hear some of the challenges put forth from the Snyder Wolves – “specific mistakes in Sklansky’s and Malmuth’s advice”, “I’ve been giving a lot of thought to the “Gap Concept” and why it’s wrong.”, “Waiting for Sklansky to speak”, ” The burden of proof was Sklansky’s, and all he did was add to his errors”, “Sklansky’s “proof” is a perfect example of his incompetence at poker logic” and on and on. This is juicy stuff!

All I can say is, between the two of them, someone has got to know what is going on here! All we want to know is how to win a bloody tournament! It seems to me that elements of both strategies are needed to win tournaments. Take a look at players like Daniel Negreneau, Erick Lindgren, Gus Hansen, Greg Raymer or Gavin Smith. They have often made some amazing lay downs to aggressive opponents, but I more often see them playing stuff like QJos, 57s, KTs and even more rubbish hands to not just one raiser, but two! These guys truly understand, like Arnold Snyder, that if you laid down like Sklansky does, you are just not going to see many final tables. By the way, have you seen David Sklansky at a final table recently?

All of the above tournament players, who are definitely more tuned into Snyder’s slant have won big, and won often. Yes, I want some of that.

Learn to Play Texas Hold’em Poker

If you want to learn to play Texas Hold’em poker, the best way is to arm yourself with as much knowledge of the game as possible. The best way to do this is to build your own library of the best low limit Texas Hold’em poker strategy books.

Book stores are flooded with poker books these days and I thought it might be a good time to list the three best books available. These books are so good that I’ll go out on a limb here and say that if you read and master what’s in these three poker books, they are likely the only ones that you ever need to read:

1. Winning Low Limit Hold’em by Lee Jones – Whenever I’m asked what books I would recommend as the first book for a beginner I suggest first reading Winning Low-Limit Hold ‘Em. Jones teaches a conservative style of play which is best for a beginning player. I feel that it is far too easy for players to lose money if they try to play aggressively too early in the learning curve.

2. Small Stakes Hold’em by Ed Miller, Mason Malmuth and David Sklansky – This is the next book that you should read due to the particular style of play taught in this book. The authors address the often overlooked strategies needed for aggressive poker play. Playing correct aggressive poker will put you in the position to maximize winning hands.

3. Hold’em Poker For Advanced Players by David Sklansky – If you find yourself in a low limit Texas Hold’em game with several good players, you will need some new skills in order to win. This book will introduce you to many of the more advanced strategies that separate poor players from good players. You’ll find truckloads of wisdom in here and as you move up the limit ladder, you’ll see how more and more of this book’s strategies apply.

If you are a beginning Texas Hold’em poker player, these three books will become the foundation for winning at Texas Hold’em and give you a big advantage at the poker table over your opponents!

Poker Book Review – All In – An E-guide To No Limit Texas Hold’em by Amarillo Slim Preston

I am really not much of a book reviewer but I would like to share this with you. While visiting Amarillo Slim’s new website http://amarilloslim.org I came across Amarillo Slim’s new ebook, All In: An E-guide To No Limit Texas Hold’em, I believe it to be the greatest and most educational book on poker yet. With so many books about poker on the market at first I was skeptical, figuring old Slim was just trying to cash in on the poker craze like everyone else but then I read the book and found It is just simply written and easy to understand. The chapter on hand odds is worth the price of the book, much less the starting hands and tells chapters that give a special insight to a great poker mind at work and a story you will not want to miss. this book also dives into many other aspects of poker including psychology, table position, and of course finding games you can beat. This book was not only informative but very entertaining.

So if you are looking for some good reading or a poker lesson that you actually learn something from, this is the book for you.

Amarillo Slim Preston is a true poker legend, member of five halls of fame, winner of five WSOP bracelets, including the WSOP Championship in 1972. Besides poker, he is also known as a world class billiard’s player and one of the most publicized proposition gamblers in history, making him one of the most successful and recognizable gamblers the world has ever known.